Therapy

Therapy

Dyslexia

Dyslexia is a learning disorder that involves difficulty reading due to problems identifying speech sounds and learning how they relate to letters and words (decoding). Also known as reading disability, dyslexia affects areas of the brain that process language.

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The Orton-Gillingham approach is an evidence-based structured literacy approach developed to specifically help children with learning differences to read and write. Our 1-2-1 instruction as early as possible (5 years old onwards) provides students with an opportunity to increase reading, writing, test-taking, and study skills at their instructional level. The pace of instruction is individualized to accommodate the different learning abilities.

These difficulties typically result from a deficit in the phonological component of language that is often unexpected in relation to other cognitive abilities and the provision of effective classroom instruction. Secondary consequences may include problems in reading comprehension and reduced reading experience that can impede growth of vocabulary and background knowledge. There are several types of dyslexia. By understanding the types of dyslexia an individual has, we can come up with strategies to help.

This definition has been adopted by the IDA Board of Directors, Nov. 12, 2002.

Dysgraphia

Dysgraphia can appear as difficulties with spelling and/or trouble putting thoughts on paper. Dysgraphia is a neurological disorder that generally appears when children are first learning to write.

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The Orton-Gillingham approach is an evidence-based structured literacy approach developed to specifically help children with learning differences to read and write. Our 1-2-1 instruction as early as possible (5 years old onwards) provides students with an opportunity to increase reading, writing, test-taking, and study skills at their instructional level. The pace of instruction is individualized to accommodate the different learning abilities.

Research has shown that orthographic coding in working memory is related to handwriting and is often impaired in dysgraphia. Orthographic coding refers to the ability to store written words in working memory while the letters in the word are analyzed or the ability to create permanent memory of written words linked to their pronunciation and meaning.

Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia is a condition that affects the ability to acquire arithmetical skills. Dyscalculic learners may have difficulty understanding simple number concepts, lack an intuitive grasp of numbers, and have problems learning number facts and procedures.

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Our Multisensory Maths is designed to teach students specific skills that build as the student progresses. This systematic and cumulative approach uses a definite, logical sequence of concept instruction. The system is structured with step-by-step procedures for introducing, reviewing, practicing, and mastering concepts. Each lesson teaches using multi-sensory tools such as videos, manipulatives, and other resources.
Because we are mastery-based and student-paced, our 1-2-1 instruction, available as early as 5 years old onwards, provides students with an opportunity to increase arithmetic skills at a functional and/or at an instructional level. The pace of instruction is individualized to accommodate the different learning abilities.

  • Surface Dyslexia – those with this condition find it difficult to remember whole words by sight and they would take longer to recognize common words by sight. They will also have trouble with words that don’t sound the way they are spelled. Reading and spelling will be affected.
  • Rapid Naming Deficit – those with this issue cannot name letters and numbers when they see them. They can say the names, but it takes them longer to name many of them in a row. Experts think this problem reflects an issue with processing speed. This affects reading speed.
  • Double Deficit Dyslexia – refers to those with both rapid naming deficit and phonological dyslexia. They have trouble isolating sounds and they can’t quickly name letters and numbers when they see them. This is a more severe form of dyslexia that is particularly challenging to remedy.

Dyslexia Screening

Take our world-class screening at the convenience and privacy of our centre. Each screening will take 20 to 30 minutes. The screening is suitable for children in the 4 to 15 age range. The screening is standardised (UK), validated, and calibrated for the early and preliminary indication of the risk of dyslexia. Each child will receive a standardized summary and recommendations report.

Because a child can only be formally diagnosed at the age of 7, the screening, providing a risk indication, allows parents to make informed decisions, including early intervention, which can begin without a formal diagnosis. *This is a screening and it should be read as a diagnosis.

Assessment

The assessment comprise of a battery of eight tests to determine reading, spelling, writing, and handwriting ability, and the gaps to fill. The assessment takes one to three hours. An assessment report will be shared in a consultation session two weeks after the assessment. 

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Following enrolment, an Individualized Tutoring Plan (ITP) will be developed for each student. Lessons reports will be shared after each session and a progress report will be shared monthly.

Who should take the assessment?

  • Those struggling with reading, spelling, writing, and handwriting
  • Those with a family history of dyslexia
  • Those formally diagnosed with dyslexia and/or dysgraphia and seek intervention
  • Gifted children
  • Homeschooling children
  • Typical children

Training & Workshops

From time to time, we will organize educational parent workshops as well as professional development workshops for educators conducted by experts.

Please refer to Events to register for upcoming parent workshops.